Tag Archives: Women’s History Month

Preach Like a Girl: Church of God Celebrates Women’s History Month

CWC staff wearing the new Preach Like a Girl T-shirts.

By Jim Lyon

February has long been recognized as Black History Month in the United States—an important focus to help all Americans discover, appreciate, and understand the terrific impact and contribution of Americans of African descent to our culture, advancement, and history. Such observations are important because history books tend to highlight the achievements of those who write them (principally white men); overcoming that limited lens strengthens all of us and honors the diverse family of humanity God designed.

Similarly, women are often under-represented in the narrative of our past. And yet, all of us know that women are half the world and indispensable players in a nation’s development and success. Women are, again by God’s design, life-givers. All of us arrived on the scene only after a mother’s journey through pregnancy and delivery. And, there’s so much more. Continue reading

Celebrating Church of God Women in Leadership Around the World

A collage of Dorothy Colney, Mailes Ndao, and Courtney Rice.

By Megan DeBruyn

At the turn of the twentieth century, labor movements across North America and Europe were gaining momentum, and the landscape of a post-war society was beginning to shift. Birthed out of this movement came women’s suffrage in the western hemisphere, and International Women’s Day along with it. In the years that followed, this worldwide observance has taken on global significance for women in modernized and developing countries alike, seeking to rally around the common goal of female advancement, both politically and economically. Continue reading

Justification without Justice: On Dreaming New Dreams

majeski-kimberly

By Kimberly Majeski

I grew up in the Wesleyan-Holiness tradition, more specifically in the fiery reformation movement known as the Church of God—Anderson, Indiana. Raised in a church that had been pastored in the early 1930s by a woman, I grew up steeped in the stories of our pioneers and their work for gender and racial equality. Before I was old enough for the youth group, I knew about Evangelist Lena Shoffner, who had preached a revival in the racist South just on the heels of the civil war. In the tent where she spoke, there was a rope hung down the middle dividing space where black and white folks could sit. As she preached the kerygma of gospel holiness and unity, she called for the rope to be torn down and the divisions to be forgotten since we are all one in Christ Jesus. Later, those who opposed Shoffner’s message of unity blew up the site where the church had been gathering. Continue reading