Tag Archives: The Gospel Trumpet

From the Archives: Synonyms of the Spirit

By Milburn Miller

In John 14:16 of the Amplified New Testament are several synonyms that help us understand the nature and work of the Holy Spirit: “And I will ask the Father, and He will give you another Comforter (Counselor, Helper, Intercessor, Advocate, Strengthener and Standby) and He may remain with you forever.”

The Holy Spirit is our Comforter. He can and will console in times of sorrow, distress, and failure. He brings a sense of peace in the midst of frustrating circumstances. What a comfort to know that the Holy Spirit dwells within us and is available for our every need! Continue reading

D. S. Warner Life Story as Told by AU’s First President

A new biography of Church of God pioneer D. S. Warner brings together a series of articles that appeared in the longtime Church of God magazine, Vital Christianity, leading up to the church’s centennial in 1980. Drawn from an unpublished book manuscript by John A. Morrison, former president of Anderson College (now University), A Life Sketch of D.S. Warner tells the evangelist’s story as a colorful narrative. Continue reading

From the Archives: Are We Thankful?

By W. E. Monk

Editor’s note—The following article by W. E. Monk was published in The Gospel Trumpet in February 1919. The first World War had come to an end only a few months earlier.

It has not been so very long since, when in almost every prayer that was uttered, God was besought to bring the war to a close; in fact, special meetings were called in many communities for the purpose of beseeching God to bring to an end the awful carnage. Continue reading

From the Archives: No Substitute for Christ

By George Selleck

The most important business or task that anyone will ever undertake is that of building the life that he is going to live. The most important feature of that life is whether it is going to count, and, if it is, for whom. Continue reading

From the Archives: Life Through Dying

By G. Q. Coplin

The student of botany is familiar with a species of plant known as the agave. This name is from the Greek, and means illustrious. The same plant is now commonly known as the century plant. It received this name because it was supposed to live one hundred years, at the expiration of which it put on its bloom. No one has seen this plant at its best without admiring its stateliness and beauty. However. the idea that the century plant does not bloom until it is a hundred years old is a mistake, for it often sends up its tall spike of flowers when only a few years old; but no sooner does it blossom than the plant begins to wither and die. It has reached the object and goal of its existence, and so it passes away. But from that tall spike falls the matured seed, and a hundred new plants spring up from the soil about the mother stalk. The parent plant gave up its life that new life might spring up in its stead. It meant sacrifice on the part of the old plant, but through its death, life has sprung up a hundredfold. Had the parent plant continued to live this would have been impossible. Continue reading

From the Archives: In the Studio of the Soul

By Elsie Egermeier

Up two flights of steps I climbed one day to visit the cozy studio of my artist friend. There I found him quietly at work. The canvas before him was bare when I arrived, but soon it began to take on the initial appearance of a painting. I watched with impatient interest in the development of the scene. A stroke here, another there (apparently meaningless to me were some of them), here a deep hue, there a light shade, but all the while the painting grew more harmonious. I noted the unhurried progress of my friend. “Why doesn’t he splash on the paint a bit more lively?” I wondered. Continue reading

From the Archives: New Year’s Reflections

By F. G. Smith

Most people regard the closing hour of the old year and the introduction of the new year as a sort of a milestone along the pathway of time. It is then that a general retrospect of past events is taken and new resolutions and purposes are formed for the upcoming year. While the Christian should at all times be actuated by the highest resolutions and purposes, it is desirable to pause at intervals and take a brief survey of the past and, profiting by all its experiences, be better able to face those problems which are to come. The result of such a consideration is beneficial, not to the individual only, but also to those with whom he stands associated; and the same principle holds true of any cooperative work in which we are engaged. Continue reading

From the Archives: God’s Workmanship

By Nina C. Smith

“For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works, which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them” (Eph 2:10 KJV). How much this means to every believer of the Lord Jesus—to fully realize that this comes personal to each of us. We are his workmanship. Through an active, humble, childlike life, the world beholds in each of us the workmanship of the Almighty God. In and through his dear children, people are to see the truth, power, faith, and glory of God, through our creation in Christ Jesus. Continue reading

From the Archives: Preserving Our Liberty

By Charles W. Naylor

Christ came into the world to make men free. We are told that “whom the Son maketh free is free indeed.” Spiritual freedom is a heritage of every child of God. When the burden of sin rolls away, how natural it is for the soul to exclaim, “I am free! I am free!” It is God’s will that this new sense of freedom be preserved, that we be free throughout life. It is our privilege to live free, natural lives, exercising our spiritual functions, and living our spiritual life free from any yoke of bondage. Paul said that even the slave of his day who was saved was the Lord’s free man. It is a wonderful thing to be free. Continue reading

From the Archives: The Church That Never Fails

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By Henry G. Johnson

In Acts 12 we read of some discouraging circumstances that faced the early church. Herod had killed James with the sword and put Peter in prison, intending to kill him after Easter. If the early church had been inclined to become easily discouraged, it would have failed at this time. But instead of letting these discouraging circumstances drive them to despair, they drove them to their knees in prayer. A praying church is one that will never fail, for when a crisis comes it knows what to do; it is acquainted with the One who knows all things and can work all things out for good to those who love God. Continue reading