Tag Archives: purity

Texas Church Tackles Trafficking on Freedom Sunday

By Jim Feirtag

At Parkgate Community Church, our vision is: “As Jesus gave his life for us, we give our lives for others in our community and world.” For us, that means we love God, love people, and love now! Partnering with CHOGTrafficklight falls well in line with that vision and mission. We were honored to join our brothers and sisters in the Church of God to commemorate Freedom Sunday again this year. We have been engaged in CHOGTrafficklight since the beginning. We believe strongly in this important cause for justice. We are convinced that it’s absolutely in line with our biblical mandate as a church. Continue reading

Freedom Fight Takes Aim at Root Causes of Trafficking

By Carl Stagner

In 2014, the Church of God reintroduced its longstanding commitment to freedom with the launch of CHOG Trafficklight. Since then, the Movement has galvanized around the cause of advancing freedom for the enslaved, the overlooked, and the oppressed through awareness and through support of established organizations. On the heels of Church of God Convention 2017, the first-ever Church of God Freedom Summit not only celebrated the success of CHOG Trafficklight, but also turned our attention to the root causes of trafficking and sexual exploitation. Trafficklight 2.0: Freedom Fight will help us fight a global scourge at an international, domestic, and local church level, even down to our own homes. Continue reading

Pornography, Trafficking, and the Church

chains_water_stock_forweb

By Levi Scott

The sexual culture of our world today is one that harms the lives of everyone made in the image of God. The link between pornography and sex trafficking should serve as a warning to all of us. Sadly, surveys reveal that people in our pews—and sometimes pulpits—each contribute to the trafficking industry by our silent acceptance and consumption of pornography. Our world is broken, people in our churches are broken, but many are doing what they can to make a difference. There are many who are actively fighting against the industries that are leaving God’s children in chains, whether in a brothel or behind a computer screen. Continue reading

A Call to Purity for 2017 and Beyond

ipad-laptop-phone-stock_forweb

By Levi Scott

Angela Lu, writer of the World news article “Connecting the dots between sex trafficking and pornography,” quoted that 87 percent of male and 31 percent of female college students watch pornography. Even more men and women outside the college environment are participating in this media—a practice that is endangering the way we look at each other as human beings. God surely knew what he was doing when he called each of us to purity. Continue reading

Exposing the Link Between Pornography and Sex Trafficking

traffic_night_stock_forweb

By Levi Scott

Although there is no longer legally sanctioned slavery in the United States, it persists among us, under the radar. According to a 2015 CNN report, “Sex-Trafficking: The New American Slavery,” the sex trafficking industry in Atlanta, Georgia, alone was worth 290 million dollars. And that was the year 2007. While few of us in churches are going to street corners in red light districts, a surprisingly high number of Christians are involved in viewing pornography, which has a major impact on the demand for, and the profit of, sex trafficking. Continue reading

Pornography: A Personal Connection with Sex Trafficking

computerclickmorguefile_FORWBE

By Jessica and Jeremy Zerkle

My husband and I were first made aware of the reality of human trafficking in 2009 while we were both in the middle of graduate studies in Wilmore, Kentucky. Our introduction came through Not for Sale, an organization devoted to combating human trafficking. Through research, interviews, books, and conferences, we learned countless stories of peoples’ lives affected by human trafficking on a global scale and, in particular, by sex trafficking. The feeling we had was likely the same feeling many of you have experienced as a result of hearing similar statistics and stories—“What can I do? What should I do?” Continue reading