Tag Archives: German

Refugees Find Community through the Church of God in Germany

Ken & Keli with extended family of John & Rhonda in their home.

Over the last couple years, the Church of God Disaster Relief fund has provided matching funds to the German national church to support strategic refugee initiatives launched by local German congregations in response to the refugee crisis there. At the invitation and hospitality of the German Church of God, Ken and Keli Oldham (Global Strategy) were able to follow up with a few of these ministries this summer. They witnessed the German church developing significant relationships with refugees as they have sought not just to serve their needs, but to include them into their fellowships. Continue reading

First Church of God, Marion, SD: Small Town, Big Impact

Photo: First Church of God, Marion, South Dakota

By Emily Ploetz

On a map of South Dakota, the town of Marion may not catch your eye. The whole community consists of about 800 people total. However, First Church of God in Marion, and its impact on God’s kingdom, should capture your attention. Out of the 800 residents of Marion, 125 of them attend the church! A church with an influence over the majority of a town isn’t something you see every day. The town and the church have a unique background and, because of some key decisions they’ve made, First Church of God continues to be a shining light. Continue reading

Where Everybody Knows Your Name (and His!)

Washington_Ave_CHOG_picnic_adj_FORWEB

By Carl Stagner

Sometimes smaller churches feel like they serve in the shadow of the larger churches around them. But not Washington Avenue Church of God in St. Joseph, Michigan. According to their pastor, Washington Avenue is an intimate community where everybody knows your name. But not just your name. To the post-millennial generation surrounding the church, the name of Jesus Christ is largely unknown. But when these young people walk through the doors of their neighborhood church, they discover the God behind what they’d thought was just an expletive. Continue reading