Tag Archives: From the Archives

From the Archives: The Annual Christmas Rush

By Gary L. Kendall

Christmastime always brings a mixture of emotions for me. I love to celebrate the Lord’s birth and it is a thrill to see so many catch God’s spirit of giving. People seem to smile more, laugh more easily, and enjoy life more in general during this season. But life always takes on a hectic side, too, with packed parking lots, people standing impatiently in checkout lines, and advertisers rudely taking advantage of our generosity. Unfortunately, this frantic flurry often overshadows that little town of Bethlehem lying so still and peaceful, nestled back in the hills. Continue reading

From the Archives: Are We Thankful?

By W. E. Monk

Editor’s note—The following article by W. E. Monk was published in The Gospel Trumpet in February 1919. The first World War had come to an end only a few months earlier.

It has not been so very long since, when in almost every prayer that was uttered, God was besought to bring the war to a close; in fact, special meetings were called in many communities for the purpose of beseeching God to bring to an end the awful carnage. Continue reading

From the Archives: Unity and Holiness

By Arlo Newell

The church which Jesus founded was built on a basis of unity. We have one Master (Matt 23:8); we are members one of another (Eph 4:25); it is to this one body that we are called (Col 3:15), and this unity is reflected in the life of the local congregation. It is the unity of a body functioning harmoniously, a building being properly joined together in symmetry and cohesiveness, or a marriage in which two have become one flesh (Rom 12:4–5; Eph 2:21–22; 5:31). In each instance the unity is an evidence of a relationship that has both internal and external theological implications. Continue reading

From the Archives: God is an Equal Opportunity Employer

By Lillie S. McCutcheon

God, our great Creator, designed creation with a purpose. The Scriptures proclaim, “Thou art worthy, O Lord, to receive glory and honor and power: for thou has created all things, and for thy pleasure they are and were created” (Rev 4:11). Human beings are the crown of creation, made in God’s likeness; and God made them male and female. Continue reading

From the Archives: No Substitute for Christ

By George Selleck

The most important business or task that anyone will ever undertake is that of building the life that he is going to live. The most important feature of that life is whether it is going to count, and, if it is, for whom. Continue reading

From the Archives: Creating an Environment of Discipleship

By H. Gerald Rudd

Preach, teach, and practice biblical holiness

Our first responsibility is to get people to see discipleship as a ministry, not a program. Many congregations believe that discipleship is nothing more than a class to take. We don’t have a discipleship program. Discipleship is the fulfillment of the Great Commission—making disciples. Continue reading

From the Archives: Life Through Dying

By G. Q. Coplin

The student of botany is familiar with a species of plant known as the agave. This name is from the Greek, and means illustrious. The same plant is now commonly known as the century plant. It received this name because it was supposed to live one hundred years, at the expiration of which it put on its bloom. No one has seen this plant at its best without admiring its stateliness and beauty. However. the idea that the century plant does not bloom until it is a hundred years old is a mistake, for it often sends up its tall spike of flowers when only a few years old; but no sooner does it blossom than the plant begins to wither and die. It has reached the object and goal of its existence, and so it passes away. But from that tall spike falls the matured seed, and a hundred new plants spring up from the soil about the mother stalk. The parent plant gave up its life that new life might spring up in its stead. It meant sacrifice on the part of the old plant, but through its death, life has sprung up a hundredfold. Had the parent plant continued to live this would have been impossible. Continue reading

From the Archives: Leaves, Neighbors, and Creative Confrontation

By C. Milton Grannum

One morning I preached a message on creative confrontation. I emphasized that life has conflicts, that simply avoiding conflicts is not always an appropriate Christian response, and that peace is not the absence of conflict, but rather a deep settled confidence that one has chosen the most appropriate options and attitudes in the conflicts of life. Continue reading

From the Archives: A Perspective on the Cross

By Paul A. Tanner

It takes two dimensions to make a cross, even as it takes two basic relationships to practice the Christian faith adequately. The one direction is Godward, the other humanward. A half cross is no cross at all. There is room for the monastery with its steeple, as well as the marketplace full of persons. Each relationship is essential to the other, and neither is independent of the other. Continue reading

From the Archives: Living the Resurrection

By Curtiss Paul DeYoung

Our time is traumatized by tragedy; people are looking for a word of triumph. Our day is darkened by despair; people are searching for a word of deliverance. Ours is an hour haunted by helplessness; people are seeking for a word of hope. We, as Christians, have that word: resurrection! Continue reading

From the Archives: In the Studio of the Soul

By Elsie Egermeier

Up two flights of steps I climbed one day to visit the cozy studio of my artist friend. There I found him quietly at work. The canvas before him was bare when I arrived, but soon it began to take on the initial appearance of a painting. I watched with impatient interest in the development of the scene. A stroke here, another there (apparently meaningless to me were some of them), here a deep hue, there a light shade, but all the while the painting grew more harmonious. I noted the unhurried progress of my friend. “Why doesn’t he splash on the paint a bit more lively?” I wondered. Continue reading

From the Archives: New Year’s Reflections

By F. G. Smith

Most people regard the closing hour of the old year and the introduction of the new year as a sort of a milestone along the pathway of time. It is then that a general retrospect of past events is taken and new resolutions and purposes are formed for the upcoming year. While the Christian should at all times be actuated by the highest resolutions and purposes, it is desirable to pause at intervals and take a brief survey of the past and, profiting by all its experiences, be better able to face those problems which are to come. The result of such a consideration is beneficial, not to the individual only, but also to those with whom he stands associated; and the same principle holds true of any cooperative work in which we are engaged. Continue reading

From the Archives: Christmas—A Divine Mission Statement

By Arlo Newell

Christians too often view the Christmas celebration as excessive commercialism. Deluged by advertising and pressured by promotion, we find it extremely difficult to discover the true meaning of the season.

It was while crying over this commercialization of the Christmas season that I was convicted to look for the good and the positive rather than to criticize. I began by giving thanks for the beauty of the season. I began by giving thanks for the beauty of the season. Lights become more meaningful in the dark, depressive days of December. The contrast makes them more distinct and the cold, crisp winter air allows the sound of silver bells to be heard more clearly. And who can fail to experience the joy of children as they anticipate this most magical of all holidays; laughter fills the air as they live in a world of expectancy. Even in the ringing of the Salvation Army bell and the iron kettle help to accentuate the carols sung by choral groups along the street. Continue reading

From the Archives: Why Give Thanks?

By John Aukerman

More than one hundred years ago, Charles Dickens wrote these words “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way.”

These words seem to be fitting for the present day, as well! In the face of rampant crime, runaway inflation, natural disasters, last year’s mindless tragedy in Guyana, and hundreds of other tragedies, the question arises, Why give thanks? At this Thanksgiving season, what is there to be thankful for? Continue reading

From the Archives: Why I Choose to Be a Pastor

By Frederick J. Davey

As of March, I have completed forty years as a minister of the Church of God, all of which has been spent in the pastoral ministry. Why would a person choose to be a pastor? Why do I still want to continue in this field? To explain why, I first need to say that I did not choose the ministry; God chose me. Of this I am very sure. I was called to be a minister while still in high school. During some of the difficult times in the work of God through the years, that calling has kept me at the task. Otherwise, I think I would have given up. Continue reading