Tag Archives: Church on the Street

Trafficklight Partner Remerge Celebrates 20 Years of Ministry

Creating art for the museum housed onsite by Remerge. Learn more at www.remerge.org.

By Carl Stagner

Twenty years ago, Church on the Street emerged in Atlanta, Georgia, radically transforming the way we do ministry to those outside the walls. Church on the Street took church to the people living without homes and beckoned traditional churchgoers into proximity with, and investment in, the lives of persons in poverty. Having become a Trafficklight partner since, Church on the Street never sought to engage the fight against trafficking; still, that fight came to them, and they’ve responded with holy boldness and love. Remerging in recent years from the starting point of reconciliation—that is, with God and neighbor—Church on the Street became known as Remerge in 2016. With intentionality, flexibility, and fervor, Remerge enters its twenty-first year, ready to change hearts from the streets to the suburbs, from underpasses to newly upholstered pews. Continue reading

AU Student Group Fights Trafficking, Experiences Church on the Street

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Photo: Bound members at Art in the Park, Atlanta.

By Carl Stagner

Some students gather to play chess, raise support for sports programs, or promote social activities and events. Bound is different. The Anderson University student-run, extra-curricular group has sought to put a dent in the epidemic of trafficking since the 2011-2012 school year. Started by now-Global Strategy missionary to Germany, Audrey Weiger, the group was actively championing the cause for freedom before CHOG TraffickLight came on the scene. From raising awareness to raising dollars, Bound is offering more and more hands-on assistance for Stripped Love in central Indiana. Not content to simply read or hear about what God is accomplishing in the work beyond Indiana, the group recently took a trip to Atlanta, Georgia, to experience Church on the Street firsthand. It was an experience they’ll never forget. Continue reading

The ‘Art’ of Reconciliation: Church on the Street Gives Garbage a Second Chance

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By Serena Ellens

“One man’s trash is another man’s treasure,” or so the ancient saying goes. But realistically speaking, how often is trash literally collected, repurposed, and beautified into a stunning new creation? Meet “The Art of Reconciliation,” a new art project recently designed by the Church on the Street ministry based in Atlanta, Georgia. Continue reading

Church on the Street to Host Reconciliation and Justice Academy

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Photo: Andy Odle (right) sharing community with the most vulnerable in Atlanta, Georgia.

By Carl Stagner

In 2013, the Global Gathering of the Church of God held its Global Forum on the subject of reconciliation. In 2014, Church of God Convention attendees were introduced to a form in which reconciliation could be lived out—in awareness and action concerning human trafficking. This May, the Church of God has an opportunity to dig deeper into what it means to be reconciled to God and neighbor. Church of the Street in Atlanta, Georgia, will host the Reconciliation and Justice Academy, May 11–15. Not just another conference, this experience is designed to be a weeklong intensive for those who really want to join with the most vulnerable among us to collectively develop the heart and habits of our Lord Jesus Christ. Continue reading

Boldly Loving the Least of These: Church on the Street’s Practical Theology

By Andy Odle

Bold is…radically loving our most vulnerable neighbors.

What if what Jesus says is true? What if in Christ we really are all one? What if Jesus really tore down the dividing walls that separate people? What if the most despised, outcast, and least in the world really are the most honored in the church? What if all of life—companionship, family, work, government—is precipitated by God’s living commandment to love him and our neighbor? In other words, what if we risked believing in reconciliation? Continue reading